Her name is Pennie. Born in 2004. She was a new born when I got her. Now she’s all grown up. 
My Violin. I love her.
madmo

Her name is Pennie. Born in 2004. She was a new born when I got her. Now she’s all grown up. 

My Violin. I love her.

madmo

imaniuzuri:

Me (Imani Uzuri ) and my #NorthCarolina Brother, scholar and satorialist Matthew D. Morrison repping for the upcoming #SinnersandSaints Festival (a 4 day festival celebrating Black American Vernacular Culture) before our #BKLive appearance promoting the festival Here is the link to our segment: https://vimeo.com/87214645 Radiant Thanks to the segment producer Kecia Élan and the whole amazing BK Live team!!! Sinners and Saints Festival starts next Wed Feb 26-Sat March 1st at JACK in Brooklyn! Here is the link for more details and to purchase $10 for each night or a $30 all festival pass:http://sinnersandsaints.brownpapertickets.com/ #bliss
(vocalist, composer and cultural worker Imani Uzuri and musicologist Matthew D. Morrison, Feb 2014)

——
Love my brilliant North Carolina sister - Vocalist, Composer, & Cultural Worker, Imani Uzuri and @_madmo_ at #BKLive before here #SinnersandSaints festival

imaniuzuri:

Me (Imani Uzuri ) and my #NorthCarolina Brother, scholar and satorialist Matthew D. Morrison repping for the upcoming #SinnersandSaints Festival (a 4 day festival celebrating Black American Vernacular Culture) before our #BKLive appearance promoting the festival Here is the link to our segment: https://vimeo.com/87214645 Radiant Thanks to the segment producer Kecia Élan and the whole amazing BK Live team!!! Sinners and Saints Festival starts next Wed Feb 26-Sat March 1st at JACK in Brooklyn! Here is the link for more details and to purchase $10 for each night or a $30 all festival pass:
http://sinnersandsaints.brownpapertickets.com/
#bliss

(vocalist, composer and cultural worker Imani Uzuri and musicologist Matthew D. Morrison, Feb 2014)

——

Love my brilliant North Carolina sister - Vocalist, Composer, & Cultural Worker, Imani Uzuri and @_madmo_ at #BKLive before here #SinnersandSaints festival

oupacademic:

So what exactly is the difference between the first and second editions of Amerigrove? View the latest infographic to find out!

——
Excited that my brief article on #LaurynHill appears in the new #Amerigrove — although I would write a different version now lol

oupacademic:

So what exactly is the difference between the first and second editions of Amerigrove? View the latest infographic to find out!

——

Excited that my brief article on #LaurynHill appears in the new #Amerigrove — although I would write a different version now lol

hiroshimalated:

Please keep this circulating. Cops are getting more and more brazen, know your rights!

vicemag:

The Evolution of Black Masculinity Through Fashion
ll eyes were on Shayne Oliver as he stepped into a sweltering Bronx church in the heat of summer, 2000. The lanky teenager shuffled into the vestibule wearing a short white crop top, exposing his taut midriff. Blots of black skin poked through hand-tattered jeans that were so tight he had to cut them up and safety-pin them back together to get them on. Shayne’s outfit set him drastically apart from the men of the congregation, who wore boxy suits. He and his mother hadn’t even taken seats in a pew before the preacher started spewing a diatribe of venomous, homophobic remarks from the pulpit. It took a moment before Shayne realized the preacher was attacking him. “Basically, the pastor ran me out of the church,” he told me recently. “I stopped going after that.”
Shayne’s now 25 and the designer of menswear label Hood By Air, whose provocative styles—along with brands like Telfar and Third Floor—are carving out a new and empowering palette of masculinity for young black men to paint from. At Shayne’s shows, it’s not out of the ordinary to see his models stalk the runway in makeup and dresses. Their bellies are often exposed, and half the time you can’t tell whether they’re men or women. But far from sissiness, the looks exude the visceral power of a lineman crushing a quarterback, or two swords clashing in an action film. This time last year, at Shayne’s debut New York Fashion Week runway show, the scene was so thick I had to stand on my tiptoes to catch a glimpse of his powerful vision of androgynous modern menswear. With macho gangster rapper A$AP Rocky on the catwalk, and stars like Kanye West and Waka Flocka Flame in the crowd offering up their adulation, the show was the birth of a new epoch in the evolution of black masculinity.
There have been others who’ve pushed similar boundaries in the past. Before Kanye and A$AP, black artists like Sly and the Family Stone in the 60s and Cameo in the 80s wore gear that looked like it was straight out of the Folsom Street Fair. In the 90s, Tupac walked in a Versace fashion show in a flamboyant gold suit.
But one of the things that sets this new wave apart from what came before is that straight men like Kanye and Rocky have no problem recognizing that some of their looks might have originated in the gay community. This kind of inclusiveness and openness is one of the many elements that signifies a shift in the way black men comport themselves in an age when the old notions of machismo, which were burdened with the baggage of 400 years of slavery and Jim Crow, continue to be chipped away.
Continue

—-been combatting expectations of machismo in my personal style since I developed one — glad to see this approach with critical considerations in high fashion by a black designer with social intent

vicemag:

The Evolution of Black Masculinity Through Fashion

ll eyes were on Shayne Oliver as he stepped into a sweltering Bronx church in the heat of summer, 2000. The lanky teenager shuffled into the vestibule wearing a short white crop top, exposing his taut midriff. Blots of black skin poked through hand-tattered jeans that were so tight he had to cut them up and safety-pin them back together to get them on. Shayne’s outfit set him drastically apart from the men of the congregation, who wore boxy suits. He and his mother hadn’t even taken seats in a pew before the preacher started spewing a diatribe of venomous, homophobic remarks from the pulpit. It took a moment before Shayne realized the preacher was attacking him. “Basically, the pastor ran me out of the church,” he told me recently. “I stopped going after that.”

Shayne’s now 25 and the designer of menswear label Hood By Air, whose provocative styles—along with brands like Telfar and Third Floor—are carving out a new and empowering palette of masculinity for young black men to paint from. At Shayne’s shows, it’s not out of the ordinary to see his models stalk the runway in makeup and dresses. Their bellies are often exposed, and half the time you can’t tell whether they’re men or women. But far from sissiness, the looks exude the visceral power of a lineman crushing a quarterback, or two swords clashing in an action film. This time last year, at Shayne’s debut New York Fashion Week runway show, the scene was so thick I had to stand on my tiptoes to catch a glimpse of his powerful vision of androgynous modern menswear. With macho gangster rapper A$AP Rocky on the catwalk, and stars like Kanye West and Waka Flocka Flame in the crowd offering up their adulation, the show was the birth of a new epoch in the evolution of black masculinity.

There have been others who’ve pushed similar boundaries in the past. Before Kanye and A$AP, black artists like Sly and the Family Stone in the 60s and Cameo in the 80s wore gear that looked like it was straight out of the Folsom Street Fair. In the 90s, Tupac walked in a Versace fashion show in a flamboyant gold suit.

But one of the things that sets this new wave apart from what came before is that straight men like Kanye and Rocky have no problem recognizing that some of their looks might have originated in the gay community. This kind of inclusiveness and openness is one of the many elements that signifies a shift in the way black men comport themselves in an age when the old notions of machismo, which were burdened with the baggage of 400 years of slavery and Jim Crow, continue to be chipped away.

Continue

—-

been combatting expectations of machismo in my personal style since I developed one — glad to see this approach with critical considerations in high fashion by a black designer with social intent

—-Truth. A love that doesn’t make me feel across the board is no love for me at all

—-
Truth. A love that doesn’t make me feel across the board is no love for me at all

(Source: universalgreatness)

—-
I can’t lol — good one SNL

(Source: northgang)

dw-4-reallife:

Well….

—-Word lol

dw-4-reallife:

Well….

—-
Word lol

realitiesconflicktin:

Mhmm.


—-100%

realitiesconflicktin:

Mhmm.

—-
100%

(Source: vanejja)

yearningforunity:

racismschool:

Meet: Ernie Barnes

Hayti community, Durham, NC

—-
I had no idea Ernie Burns was from NC. Black folks from my state stay representing.

thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.
McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”
McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:


"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."


In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:


"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:
" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’
"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.
"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:
" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’
"McCain says he was stunned:
" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."
"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.
"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."



Source



—-This is the type of legacy the black folks in my homestate have been a part of since it became one. #northcarolina

thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.

McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”

McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:

"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."

In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:

"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:

" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’

"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.

"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:

" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’

"McCain says he was stunned:

" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."

"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.

"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."

—-
This is the type of legacy the black folks in my homestate have been a part of since it became one. #northcarolina

vampmissedith:

spinningyarns:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.So.Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humansCelsius: what temperatures affect waterKelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

Why didn’t my science teachers ever see fit to toss off this little fact?

Well that explains a lot, jesus.


—-This is so clear

vampmissedith:

spinningyarns:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.

Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.

Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.

Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.

So.
Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humans
Celsius: what temperatures affect water
Kelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

Why didn’t my science teachers ever see fit to toss off this little fact?

Well that explains a lot, jesus.

—-
This is so clear

asknc:

songpath:

Clyde McPhatter - You’re Movin’ Me http://bit.ly/13LBxxb

He was born and raised in Durham’s Hayti district, and like most of the singers in my borders, honed his skills in his church choir. Clyde could sing his heart out, and it earned him the honor of being a double inductee in the Music Hall of Fame. Heck, when you’re a part of great doo-wop groups like The Dominoes and The Drifters, THEN you go on and rack up hits on your own, you deserve the accolades! Unfortunately, he had two things going against him that ended his career, I feel, before his time. He was under a lot of bad management contracts with record companies, so he never saw nearly the amount of money he deserved. He also lost a battle with terrible depression and alcoholism at the age of 39. But, Mr. McPhatter, you touched a lot of people’s hearts and you were one of the most imitated voices in music back in the day. I salute you!

asknc:

songpath:

Clyde McPhatter - You’re Movin’ Me http://bit.ly/13LBxxb

He was born and raised in Durham’s Hayti district, and like most of the singers in my borders, honed his skills in his church choir. Clyde could sing his heart out, and it earned him the honor of being a double inductee in the Music Hall of Fame. Heck, when you’re a part of great doo-wop groups like The Dominoes and The Drifters, THEN you go on and rack up hits on your own, you deserve the accolades! Unfortunately, he had two things going against him that ended his career, I feel, before his time. He was under a lot of bad management contracts with record companies, so he never saw nearly the amount of money he deserved. He also lost a battle with terrible depression and alcoholism at the age of 39. But, Mr. McPhatter, you touched a lot of people’s hearts and you were one of the most imitated voices in music back in the day. I salute you!