lion:

SHADE

—-
Hahaha

Nicki shady lol. she right though.

But I wonder if she realize the rather (in)authentic (to use her term) “pop” she’s made and helped make popular over the years (vs. the mixtape style rapping she first gained notoriety for) has opened the flood gates for more (in)authentic artists to sound “like that” in pop music

(note: many styles of hip/hop and rap are also considered “pop” by “industry standards” aka record sales aka circulation)

— and by “like that” I mean sounding (in)authentic.

but it’s not so different from what happened after Motown shut down the air waves with their new “pop” sounds and folks started copying the formula to make (in)authentic pop sounds— it’s just that theirs had so much more consideration for who is listening and what happens when they do —

just my professional musicological opinion

pizzaperty:

jessehimself:

Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System
Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.
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Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.

Burn in hell bye!

pizzaperty:

jessehimself:

Pennsylvania Judge Sentenced For 28 Years For Selling Kids to the Prison System

Mark Ciavarella Jr, a 61-year old former judge in Pennsylvania, has been sentenced to nearly 30 years in prison for literally selling young juveniles for cash. He was convicted of accepting money in exchange for incarcerating thousands of adults and children into a prison facility owned by a developer who was paying him under the table. The kickbacks amounted to more than $1 million.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has overturned some 4,000 convictions issued by him between 2003 and 2008, claiming he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles – including the right to legal counsel and the right to intelligently enter a plea. Some of the juveniles he sentenced were as young as 10-years old.

Ciavarella was convicted of 12 counts, including racketeering, money laundering, mail fraud and tax evasion. He was also ordered to repay $1.2 million in restitution.

His “kids for cash” program has revealed that corruption is indeed within the prison system, mostly driven by the growth in private prisons seeking profits by any means necessary.

—-

Why might this not be a HUGE national story and his name not household? I’ll give you one guess what color those kids were.

Burn in hell bye!

(Source: thefreelioness)

Gentrifiers focus on aesthetics, not people. Because people, to them, are aesthetics.

Proponents of gentrification will vouch for its benevolence by noting it “cleaned up the neighbourhood”. This is often code for a literal white-washing. The problems that existed in the neighbourhood - poverty, lack of opportunity, struggling populations denied city services - did not go away. They were simply priced out to a new location.

That new location is often an impoverished suburb, which lacks the glamour to make it the object of future renewal efforts. There is no history to attract preservationists because there is nothing in poor suburbs viewed as worth preserving, including the futures of the people forced to live in them. This is blight without beauty, ruin without romance: payday loan stores, dollar stores, unassuming homes and unpaid bills. In the suburbs, poverty looks banal and is overlooked.

In cities, gentrifiers have the political clout - and accompanying racial privilege - to reallocate resources and repair infrastructure. The neighbourhood is “cleaned up” through the removal of its residents. Gentrifiers can then bask in “urban life” - the storied history, the selective nostalgia, the carefully sprinkled grit - while avoiding responsibility to those they displaced.

Sarah Kendzior - The peril of hipster economics (x)

(Source: mizoguchi)

explore-blog:

The Power of Music – one Vietnam veteran’s remarkable story of how music bridged humanity in the midst of war.

This gives Edna St. Vincent Millay’s memorable words –without music I should wish to die" – a whole new dimension of meaning.

Couple with the science of how music enchants the brain.

chescaleigh:

"Black-ish" coming to ABC this Fall, Wednesdays at 9:30pm est

Tracee Ellis Ross and Anthony Anderson are officially headed toward the small screen with new series, Black-ish. According to the Hollywood Reporter, ABC announced today that the pilot has been picked up for its 2014-15 roster. The comedy loosely based on the life of The Game writer, Kenya Barris, sees Anderson as an “upper-middle-class black man who struggles to raise his children with a sense of cultural identity despite constant contradictions from his liberal wife, old-school father and his own assimilated, color-blind kids.” 
(via Essence.com)

——

Yes!! Lmao. Hilarious.

museumofmodernerotica said: Maybe this is a crazy question, but how did Europeans know what Africans looked like? I know that some of the paintings here are of North Africans/Middle Easterners, but others clearly depict people born south of the Sahara. I've heard of Prester John but I never imagined that medieval Europeans were aware that Prester John would have had brown skin. Am I missing something?

medievalpoc:

medievalpoc:

Like. There are a lot of things I could say here. But I’m just going to do my best to answer your question, and the answer is either very simple or very complicated, depending on your current point of view.

1. “They” knew what people with brown skin looked like because people with brown skin had been there literally THE ENTIRE TIME. Some (and father back, ALL) of “them” had brown skin themselves.

2. “People with Brown Skin” and “Europeans” are not separate and mutually exclusive groups.

3. No matter how far back you go, the mythical time that you’re looking for, when all-white, racially and culturally isolated Europe was “real”, will continue to recede from your grasp until it winkles out the like imaginary place it is.

We can just keep going back. In every area, from all walks of life, rich and poor, kings and peasants, artists and iconoclasts, before there were countries and continents, before there were white people.

Russia, 1899:

image

Switzerland, c. 1800:  [fixed link here]

image

Netherlands, 1658:

image

Poland, 1539:

image

Germany, 1480s:

image

Spain, 1420s:

image

France, 1332:

image

Scotland, England, France, 1280s:

image

France, 1220s:

image

England, 1178:

image

Belgium, 1084:

image

Greece, c. 1000:

image

Spain, 850s:

image

Throughout Europe, 800s-500s:

image

England, c. 300 AD:

image

Scotland, c. 100 AD:

image

image

Italy, 79 AD:

image

Greece, 170 B.C.:

image

Greece, 300 B. C.:

image

Greece, 400s B.C.

image

Greece, 500s B.C.:

image

Egypt, 1200s B.C.:

image

Crete (Minoan), 1600 B.C.:

image

Crete (Minoan), early 2000s B.C.:

image

Romania, 34,000 B.C.:

image

The time when “EVERYONE” in Europe was White does not exist. They knew what people with brown skin looked like because they were there. They knew what “Africans” looked like because they were there, and they weren’t “they”, they were us, or you. I think what you’re missing is something that never existed.

I realize many of my readers have already seen this post, but I’m getting a few asks from some new folks, and I hope this helps to answer their questions.

The source for each image is linked to above, and for those who have objected to the inclusion of an Egyptian image (Egypt is in the continent of Africa, yet this hasn’t stopped historians from claiming Egyptians were “white” people), this is apparently still “shocking news” to some people, including apparently scientists. [links contain images of human remains/deceased persons] The beauty implements the woman in the statue above is holding include hairstyling products. Egyptian people during this time used oil-based conditioners and styling products, as has been confirmed by chemical analysis of preserved bodies of Egyptian people.

—-
#truth

Her name is Pennie. Born in 2004. She was a new born when I got her. Now she’s all grown up. 
My Violin. I love her.
madmo

Her name is Pennie. Born in 2004. She was a new born when I got her. Now she’s all grown up. 

My Violin. I love her.

madmo

imaniuzuri:

Me (Imani Uzuri ) and my #NorthCarolina Brother, scholar and satorialist Matthew D. Morrison repping for the upcoming #SinnersandSaints Festival (a 4 day festival celebrating Black American Vernacular Culture) before our #BKLive appearance promoting the festival Here is the link to our segment: https://vimeo.com/87214645 Radiant Thanks to the segment producer Kecia Élan and the whole amazing BK Live team!!! Sinners and Saints Festival starts next Wed Feb 26-Sat March 1st at JACK in Brooklyn! Here is the link for more details and to purchase $10 for each night or a $30 all festival pass:http://sinnersandsaints.brownpapertickets.com/ #bliss
(vocalist, composer and cultural worker Imani Uzuri and musicologist Matthew D. Morrison, Feb 2014)

——
Love my brilliant North Carolina sister - Vocalist, Composer, & Cultural Worker, Imani Uzuri and @_madmo_ at #BKLive before here #SinnersandSaints festival

imaniuzuri:

Me (Imani Uzuri ) and my #NorthCarolina Brother, scholar and satorialist Matthew D. Morrison repping for the upcoming #SinnersandSaints Festival (a 4 day festival celebrating Black American Vernacular Culture) before our #BKLive appearance promoting the festival Here is the link to our segment: https://vimeo.com/87214645 Radiant Thanks to the segment producer Kecia Élan and the whole amazing BK Live team!!! Sinners and Saints Festival starts next Wed Feb 26-Sat March 1st at JACK in Brooklyn! Here is the link for more details and to purchase $10 for each night or a $30 all festival pass:
http://sinnersandsaints.brownpapertickets.com/
#bliss

(vocalist, composer and cultural worker Imani Uzuri and musicologist Matthew D. Morrison, Feb 2014)

——

Love my brilliant North Carolina sister - Vocalist, Composer, & Cultural Worker, Imani Uzuri and @_madmo_ at #BKLive before here #SinnersandSaints festival

oupacademic:

So what exactly is the difference between the first and second editions of Amerigrove? View the latest infographic to find out!

——
Excited that my brief article on #LaurynHill appears in the new #Amerigrove — although I would write a different version now lol

oupacademic:

So what exactly is the difference between the first and second editions of Amerigrove? View the latest infographic to find out!

——

Excited that my brief article on #LaurynHill appears in the new #Amerigrove — although I would write a different version now lol

hiroshimalated:

Please keep this circulating. Cops are getting more and more brazen, know your rights!

vicemag:

The Evolution of Black Masculinity Through Fashion
ll eyes were on Shayne Oliver as he stepped into a sweltering Bronx church in the heat of summer, 2000. The lanky teenager shuffled into the vestibule wearing a short white crop top, exposing his taut midriff. Blots of black skin poked through hand-tattered jeans that were so tight he had to cut them up and safety-pin them back together to get them on. Shayne’s outfit set him drastically apart from the men of the congregation, who wore boxy suits. He and his mother hadn’t even taken seats in a pew before the preacher started spewing a diatribe of venomous, homophobic remarks from the pulpit. It took a moment before Shayne realized the preacher was attacking him. “Basically, the pastor ran me out of the church,” he told me recently. “I stopped going after that.”
Shayne’s now 25 and the designer of menswear label Hood By Air, whose provocative styles—along with brands like Telfar and Third Floor—are carving out a new and empowering palette of masculinity for young black men to paint from. At Shayne’s shows, it’s not out of the ordinary to see his models stalk the runway in makeup and dresses. Their bellies are often exposed, and half the time you can’t tell whether they’re men or women. But far from sissiness, the looks exude the visceral power of a lineman crushing a quarterback, or two swords clashing in an action film. This time last year, at Shayne’s debut New York Fashion Week runway show, the scene was so thick I had to stand on my tiptoes to catch a glimpse of his powerful vision of androgynous modern menswear. With macho gangster rapper A$AP Rocky on the catwalk, and stars like Kanye West and Waka Flocka Flame in the crowd offering up their adulation, the show was the birth of a new epoch in the evolution of black masculinity.
There have been others who’ve pushed similar boundaries in the past. Before Kanye and A$AP, black artists like Sly and the Family Stone in the 60s and Cameo in the 80s wore gear that looked like it was straight out of the Folsom Street Fair. In the 90s, Tupac walked in a Versace fashion show in a flamboyant gold suit.
But one of the things that sets this new wave apart from what came before is that straight men like Kanye and Rocky have no problem recognizing that some of their looks might have originated in the gay community. This kind of inclusiveness and openness is one of the many elements that signifies a shift in the way black men comport themselves in an age when the old notions of machismo, which were burdened with the baggage of 400 years of slavery and Jim Crow, continue to be chipped away.
Continue

—-been combatting expectations of machismo in my personal style since I developed one — glad to see this approach with critical considerations in high fashion by a black designer with social intent

vicemag:

The Evolution of Black Masculinity Through Fashion

ll eyes were on Shayne Oliver as he stepped into a sweltering Bronx church in the heat of summer, 2000. The lanky teenager shuffled into the vestibule wearing a short white crop top, exposing his taut midriff. Blots of black skin poked through hand-tattered jeans that were so tight he had to cut them up and safety-pin them back together to get them on. Shayne’s outfit set him drastically apart from the men of the congregation, who wore boxy suits. He and his mother hadn’t even taken seats in a pew before the preacher started spewing a diatribe of venomous, homophobic remarks from the pulpit. It took a moment before Shayne realized the preacher was attacking him. “Basically, the pastor ran me out of the church,” he told me recently. “I stopped going after that.”

Shayne’s now 25 and the designer of menswear label Hood By Air, whose provocative styles—along with brands like Telfar and Third Floor—are carving out a new and empowering palette of masculinity for young black men to paint from. At Shayne’s shows, it’s not out of the ordinary to see his models stalk the runway in makeup and dresses. Their bellies are often exposed, and half the time you can’t tell whether they’re men or women. But far from sissiness, the looks exude the visceral power of a lineman crushing a quarterback, or two swords clashing in an action film. This time last year, at Shayne’s debut New York Fashion Week runway show, the scene was so thick I had to stand on my tiptoes to catch a glimpse of his powerful vision of androgynous modern menswear. With macho gangster rapper A$AP Rocky on the catwalk, and stars like Kanye West and Waka Flocka Flame in the crowd offering up their adulation, the show was the birth of a new epoch in the evolution of black masculinity.

There have been others who’ve pushed similar boundaries in the past. Before Kanye and A$AP, black artists like Sly and the Family Stone in the 60s and Cameo in the 80s wore gear that looked like it was straight out of the Folsom Street Fair. In the 90s, Tupac walked in a Versace fashion show in a flamboyant gold suit.

But one of the things that sets this new wave apart from what came before is that straight men like Kanye and Rocky have no problem recognizing that some of their looks might have originated in the gay community. This kind of inclusiveness and openness is one of the many elements that signifies a shift in the way black men comport themselves in an age when the old notions of machismo, which were burdened with the baggage of 400 years of slavery and Jim Crow, continue to be chipped away.

Continue

—-

been combatting expectations of machismo in my personal style since I developed one — glad to see this approach with critical considerations in high fashion by a black designer with social intent

—-Truth. A love that doesn’t make me feel across the board is no love for me at all

—-
Truth. A love that doesn’t make me feel across the board is no love for me at all

(Source: universalgreatness)

—-
I can’t lol — good one SNL

(Source: northgang)