dw-4-reallife:

Well….

—-Word lol

dw-4-reallife:

Well….

—-
Word lol

realitiesconflicktin:

Mhmm.


—-100%

realitiesconflicktin:

Mhmm.

—-
100%

(Source: vanejja)

yearningforunity:

racismschool:

Meet: Ernie Barnes

Hayti community, Durham, NC

—-
I had no idea Ernie Burns was from NC. Black folks from my state stay representing.

thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.
McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”
McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:


"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."


In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:


"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:
" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’
"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.
"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:
" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’
"McCain says he was stunned:
" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."
"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.
"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."



Source



—-This is the type of legacy the black folks in my homestate have been a part of since it became one. #northcarolina

thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.

McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”

McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:

"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."

In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:

"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:

" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’

"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.

"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:

" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’

"McCain says he was stunned:

" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."

"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.

"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."

—-
This is the type of legacy the black folks in my homestate have been a part of since it became one. #northcarolina

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

vampmissedith:

spinningyarns:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.So.Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humansCelsius: what temperatures affect waterKelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

Why didn’t my science teachers ever see fit to toss off this little fact?

Well that explains a lot, jesus.


—-This is so clear

vampmissedith:

spinningyarns:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.

Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.

Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.

Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.

So.
Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humans
Celsius: what temperatures affect water
Kelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

Why didn’t my science teachers ever see fit to toss off this little fact?

Well that explains a lot, jesus.

—-
This is so clear

asknc:

songpath:

Clyde McPhatter - You’re Movin’ Me http://bit.ly/13LBxxb

He was born and raised in Durham’s Hayti district, and like most of the singers in my borders, honed his skills in his church choir. Clyde could sing his heart out, and it earned him the honor of being a double inductee in the Music Hall of Fame. Heck, when you’re a part of great doo-wop groups like The Dominoes and The Drifters, THEN you go on and rack up hits on your own, you deserve the accolades! Unfortunately, he had two things going against him that ended his career, I feel, before his time. He was under a lot of bad management contracts with record companies, so he never saw nearly the amount of money he deserved. He also lost a battle with terrible depression and alcoholism at the age of 39. But, Mr. McPhatter, you touched a lot of people’s hearts and you were one of the most imitated voices in music back in the day. I salute you!

asknc:

songpath:

Clyde McPhatter - You’re Movin’ Me http://bit.ly/13LBxxb

He was born and raised in Durham’s Hayti district, and like most of the singers in my borders, honed his skills in his church choir. Clyde could sing his heart out, and it earned him the honor of being a double inductee in the Music Hall of Fame. Heck, when you’re a part of great doo-wop groups like The Dominoes and The Drifters, THEN you go on and rack up hits on your own, you deserve the accolades! Unfortunately, he had two things going against him that ended his career, I feel, before his time. He was under a lot of bad management contracts with record companies, so he never saw nearly the amount of money he deserved. He also lost a battle with terrible depression and alcoholism at the age of 39. But, Mr. McPhatter, you touched a lot of people’s hearts and you were one of the most imitated voices in music back in the day. I salute you!

weather-underground:

laborreguitina:

zorrozapatistazootero:

cloudyskiesandcatharsis:

Last Meals of Innocent Men

Campaign for Amnesty International, displaying the final meal requests of prisoners executed on Death Row, who were later found innocent.

Photographed by James Reynolds

disturbing and sad.

remember the dead - fight like hell for the living! no justice, no peace!

this is why we are fighting!

—-
wow. no joke

kemetically-afrolatino:

De Blasio Faces Protest for Picking Bill Bratton, “Architect of Stop and Frisk,” as New NYPD Commissioner (Democracy NOW!)

A protest was held in New York City on Monday against incoming Mayor Bill de Blasio’s appointment of William Bratton as the next police commissioner.

Bratton returns to the job after leading the New York City Police Department in the mid-1990s, embracing a controversial strategy of cracking down on low-level offenses.

De Blasio campaigned on a promise to curb the NYPD’s controversial stop-and-frisk policy, but Bratton actually expanded the program while heading the Los Angeles police.

See video of the protest, and a random convo w/ Lewis Black about Bratton, here

more info here

—-
Let’s hope they don’t bring the same ‘ole shyt to a different toilet

beother:

StereoTypes - LA: Porn and Fakeness

Does everyone in LA work in porn? Are those breasts real? With an abundance of nature, diversity and creativity in Los Angeles, why does everyone stereotype it as a wasteland of shallowness and broken dreams? Ryan Hall takes StereoTypes to LA to find out if there is anything beneath the surface. 

This guy, lol

“How you vibrate is what the universe echoes back to you.”
Panache (via ignitingenergy)
revolutionary-mindset:

Sapelo Island, Georgia — It’s a culture struggling to survive. Fewer than 50 people — all descendants of slaves — fear they may soon be taxed out of the property their families have owned since the days of slavery.
They are the Gullah-Geechee people of Sapelo Island off Georgia’s coast, near Savannah. This small, simple community is finding itself embroiled in a feud with local officials over a sudden, huge increase in property assessments that are raising property taxes as much as 600% for some.  Many say the increase could force them to sell their ancestral properties. “Sapelo being the only intact Gullah-Geechee community in the country that’s left, that is a part of history. It will be a shame not to preserve””That’s part of the American history. That’s part of what built this country,” said Charles Hall, 79, a retired U.S. Air Force colonel who was born under a midwife’s care in the same home he lives in today.
McIntosh County’s decision to reappraise homes on the island sparked the problem.

revolutionary-mindset:

Sapelo Island, Georgia — It’s a culture struggling to survive. Fewer than 50 people — all descendants of slaves — fear they may soon be taxed out of the property their families have owned since the days of slavery.

They are the Gullah-Geechee people of Sapelo Island off Georgia’s coast, near Savannah. This small, simple community is finding itself embroiled in a feud with local officials over a sudden, huge increase in property assessments that are raising property taxes as much as 600% for some.
Many say the increase could force them to sell their ancestral properties. “Sapelo being the only intact Gullah-Geechee community in the country that’s left, that is a part of history. It will be a shame not to preserve””That’s part of the American history. That’s part of what built this country,” said Charles Hall, 79, a retired U.S. Air Force colonel who was born under a midwife’s care in the same home he lives in today.

McIntosh County’s decision to reappraise homes on the island sparked the problem.